"Daddy, what does wicked mean?”

“It means someone who doesn’t love God and does mean things.”   

“What does righteous mean?”  

Someone who loves God and does right things.”  

This was a conversation I had with my three-year old daughter the first time our family memorized Psalm 1.  Amalie is six now, but when she was three she related most of her world to an alternate reality that she called her "pink and purple house." And it really was an alternate reality.  Different family, parents, life story, everything. She even drew pictures of this alternate reality. At her pink and purple house, "Superman is my uncle," she said.  "At my pink and purple house... my dad died.... my house burnt down." In those days we feared what we might hear from the Sunday school teachers when we picked her up after class! Once, when she was frustrated with my wife, she said, "At my pink and purple house my mommy lets me say naughty words!"  We finally discovered a key to understanding "the pink and purple" world was that it had a different, usually backwards, set of rules.  

So after my inquisitive and creative three-year old asked the meanings wicked and righteous she promptly said, “In my pink and purple house wicked means you do good things and righteous means you do naughty things.” 

In that moment my daughter unwittingly demonstrated the heart of a scoffer.  A scoffer is someone who looks at what God says is good and calls it bad.  A scoffer is one who looks at what God says is bad and calls it good. A scoffer loves evil and hates good.  

As my wife and I talked to our kids about scoffers at supper on Monday she observed how pervasive--even among believers--scoffing is.  We only think of it in the most extreme cases, but she was right.  It is more present than we care to admit. How often do we invite in evil and make fun of righteousness?  Just look at your entertainment choices in the last month.  "Blessed is the man who walks not in the counsel of the wicked, nor stands in the way of sinners, nor sits in the seat of scoffers."

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